Roasted corn off the cob

Sometimes it’s nice to have summer corn OFF the cob. My favorite way to do this is to sauté corn with olive oil, peppers and red onion, and then let a bit of garlic join the party near the end. Takes about 10-15 minutes tops to cook. Or you can pop in a hot oven on a sheet pan if it’s not 90 degrees.

That’s it.  The technique comes from White Dog Café cookbook, which has long been a favorite cookbook. Judy Wickes has you make a salsa with lime after the corn cooks, which is a very good idea, but I haven’t gone to that stage yet and have been happily mired in the eat after the first step stage. It’s good. Here’s her recipe: https://tinyurl.com/y8up78sl

Here’s a rough guide:

Remove kernels from corn cobs with a big sharp knife. Dice some nice peppers — a medium hot/sweet and a serrano or other hot pepper makes a nice balance. Or you can use also a red sweet pepper. Rough chop red onion. Mince a garlic clover.

Heat a pan, add olive oil, and corn, peppers and onion and cook at high temp for up to 10 minutes, stirring often. Altnernatively, heat the oven to 450 degrees, mix your corn, onion and peppers together with S&P in a bowl, and toss with a bit of olive oil, glob on some olive oil, dump in your corn, and roast for 10-15 minutes, adding in garlic a minute before it’s all cooked — or you can add the garlic when it comes out of the oven.  All good. Let sit until the rest of your dinner cooks, and enjoy! Corn may only marginally be considered a vegetable, but peppers, onion and garlic are high in the healthy scorecard, and hey, it’s all better than potato chips! Enjoy!

Sautéed chicken breasts, for a change

Let’s say you’ve got the boneless chicken breast sauté technique down, and you have worked it into your repetoire: Cook some vegetables, and then throw a chicken breast or three into a hot sauté pan, make a quick butter/lemon pan sauce and you’re done. Done that 10 times and over it.

Here’s a change of pace I discovered in Diana Henry’s brilliant chicken-all-ways cookbook A Bird in the Hand:  Chicken Breasts with Wild Mushroom sauce.  Here’s an exact recipe: https://tinyurl.com/yd3el7ar

But you will want to buy this book because it will bring chicken back into weeknight — and dinner party — rotation, in a very happy, and low-stress way.

Basically you soak some dried porcini or other wild mushrooms in boiling water for 15 minutes, Sauté some fresh mushrooms in butter — cremini is now my standard fresh mushroom — throw in the soaked dried mushrooms, add in the soaking liquid and some chicken stock, and reduce, and then add in some cream, and reduce again. Easy-peasy. You can make the sauce ahead of cooking the chicken and let it hang nearby while you cook the rest of your meal. Then when you’re ready, you sauté a chicken breast or three, and serve with the sauce. It is very, very delicious. Like the best mushroom bisque. Not too rich, and the soaking liquid adds a bass note/unami flavor. (You may be more of a lady than moi, and serve a delicate amount of sauce with chicken!)

Diana Henry has you serve the chicken and mushroom sauce over lentils, which seems to be a fine idea. But I didn’t take the time first go-round. I made a variation of White Dog Cafe’s roasted corn salsa since I had the first of the summer’s corn on hand.