Pan seared brussels sprouts with maple syrup and mustard

I love Brussels sprouts. Especially after the first frost when their flavor intensifies. Heck I’ll eat ‘em whenever (except spring and summer).
But the problem is the challenge in cooking them well. I grew up detesting them because when they are steamed to mush they taste vile, thanks to their cabbage lineage, and stink cabbage-like too with an unappealing mush. Then I grew up and happily threw them into a steamer to just tender, douse in butter and enjoy as a side dish for dinner. Pretty good.

One great way was to stick in a earthenware covered pot with pancetta, S&P, and bake the life out of ‘em. Somehow they went past the vile mushy stage to pure indulgence. Very good.

Then I tried the cut-in-half-and-roast technique which was invariably frustrating and somewhat stressful because they burned and also didn’t soften. But I know that roasting vegetables is great for flavor.
Then . . .. enter Dorie Greenspan, the doyenne of home baking, out with her here’s-what-I-like-to-cook-at-home cookbook with a new twist on Brussels sprouts cooking technique: Par-cook ‘em (hold for a day in fridge if you like) and then cut in half and sauté over high heat. Stir in mustard-maple syrup mixture, cooked bacon or pancetta, and then sprinkle with apple cider vinegar. Brilliant.

Here’s how:

Toss brussels sprouts with slivered garlic, shallots, S&P, and steam until just barely tender.
Dump into bowl of ice water to stop the cooking. Hold at room temp or refrigerate for up to 24 hours.

Mix together: 1 T Dijon mustard (grainy/smooth combo is best)
2 T maple syrup
Cut Brussels sprouts in half
Cook 1 slice of bacon, or equivalent pancetta, diced, until crispy.
Pour out fat leaving 1 T in pan.
Add 1 T olive oil, and sauté over high heat, stirring to get sprouts caramelized in spots.
Turn heat down to medium low, and Add in mustard mixture, stirring.
Remove from heat and put in bowl.
Sprinkle apple cider vinegar on top.

Goes great with Fennel-encrusted pork chops and roasted sweet potato wedges (with thyme).

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