Asian style grain bowl with roasted veggies

Perfect for late summer harvest.

Since grain bowls are all the rage, I thought I would test the waters today as my hunger inched up. Having procured some black/forbidden rice at my local natural foods store, I boiled some up, roasted some eggplant, and then a pan of large-julienned carrots, cut up peppers, onion, mushroom at 425 degrees in oiled pans. Added garlic last minute to the carrot mixture. Should go in the oven in this order: carrots, peppers, onion and mushrooms all together. Right after the eggplant wedges go in on their own tray. Then last few minutes mix in garlic with carrot medley.

Asian vinaigrette:  2 T rice wine vinegar, 2 T soy sauce, good dash siracha, toasted sesame oil, olive oil, canola oil, S&P. Whisk together. Not bad, even if there was no ginger in the house.

To cook black rice: Rinse 1 c rice and put in small pot with 1-3/4 c water and some salt. Bring to a boil, cover and cook gently for 30 minutes. Al dente, nutty, delicious!

Assemble: rice on one side, eggplant on the other, carrot medley in middle, drizzle dressing on top. Perhaps top with fresh mozzarella cubes or queso fresca if it’s on hand.

 

Advertisements

Roasted eggplant with stewed lentils

… and fresh tomatoes and mozzarella. (I had fresh locally made mozzarella, so that plate is loaded up!)

Just when eggplants are starting to come in in mid- to late August — plumb and firm, roast some widgets (bigger than wedges) with garlic & oil (&S&P) at 410 degrees for 25 mins.

Put up a pot of vegetable stock with: carrots, celery, onions, parsley, garlic, zucchini if you got lots of it, particularly if it’s getting oldish, and some peppercorns and hey one bay leaf and a new potato if there is one in your kitchen. 45 minutes is it, then strain and chill/freeze.

Use some of the stock to make stewed lentils: Saute onion, then carrots, celery and garlic in oil w/ S&P, some cumin if you’re in the mood; add puy lentils and cover with twice as much stock/water. Simmer about 30-40 minutes until tender.

Plate up:
Stewed lentils
Eggplant
fresh mozzarella pieces
cherry tomatoes, halved on the side, seasoned with some salt & maybe some olive oil.

Eating zucchini in a non-healthy way

Eating zucchini or, how to eat in season without chomping on sunflower sprouts

Not there’s anything bad about sprouts. But sometimes an eater wants to skip over the raw kale salad and vinegar slaw and eat some comfort food, even if IS summer and the bounty is plentiful!

Here’s how to do it:

Take a non ginormous zucchini or two, plop in a bowl of water to soak (Marcella’s technique for loosening ground sitting vegetable from its soil), boil some pasta, chop a bit of onion and sauté it in butter, add zucchini which you have cut into julienne, pour in some pasta water to reduce, add cream and saffron and reduce again. That’s it!

When your pasta — I recommend fettucine — is done, serve under cream sauce and add grated parmesan. I think I can skip the ice cream on this night. I had my cream in savory form, thanks!

Ingredients:
1/4 # fettucini
4 T chopped onion
1-2 small zucchinis, cut into julienne strips, 1-1/2” by 1/4”
1 c heavy cream
Pinch saffron
grated parmesan

 

Spring variation: substitute asparagus for zucchini; steam it ahead before cutting into 1-1/2” lengths before sautéing as above.

Roasted corn off the cob

Sometimes it’s nice to have summer corn OFF the cob. My favorite way to do this is to sauté corn with olive oil, peppers and red onion, and then let a bit of garlic join the party near the end. Takes about 10-15 minutes tops to cook. Or you can pop in a hot oven on a sheet pan if it’s not 90 degrees.

That’s it.  The technique comes from White Dog Café cookbook, which has long been a favorite cookbook. Judy Wickes has you make a salsa with lime after the corn cooks, which is a very good idea, but I haven’t gone to that stage yet and have been happily mired in the eat after the first step stage. It’s good. Here’s her recipe: https://tinyurl.com/y8up78sl

Here’s a rough guide:

Remove kernels from corn cobs with a big sharp knife. Dice some nice peppers — a medium hot/sweet and a serrano or other hot pepper makes a nice balance. Or you can use also a red sweet pepper. Rough chop red onion. Mince a garlic clover.

Heat a pan, add olive oil, and corn, peppers and onion and cook at high temp for up to 10 minutes, stirring often. Altnernatively, heat the oven to 450 degrees, mix your corn, onion and peppers together with S&P in a bowl, and toss with a bit of olive oil, glob on some olive oil, dump in your corn, and roast for 10-15 minutes, adding in garlic a minute before it’s all cooked — or you can add the garlic when it comes out of the oven.  All good. Let sit until the rest of your dinner cooks, and enjoy! Corn may only marginally be considered a vegetable, but peppers, onion and garlic are high in the healthy scorecard, and hey, it’s all better than potato chips! Enjoy!

Turnips!

Okay, kids, boil away!  “No way!” I hear hordes shouting.  Yes, indeed, I’m here to tell you that those staple roots available at very reasonable prices at farmers markets in early summer and fall to winter are actually an enjoyable vegetable to eat at dinner.  They’re a low carb alternative to potatoes on your dinner plate.  And if you cook them promptly the greens are delicious with ’em, so you get a double dose of veggies — roots and greens — for one effort. And everything is better with roasted garlic, which this has.

Here’s what you do, per the very excellent and wacky Power Vegetables by the Lucky Peach folks.  Boil them and toss them with a snazzy anchovy, caper vinaigrette and eat your low-carb veggies happily.  You boil the peeled, cut turnips for 15 minutes or less, throw in their greens at the end (or arugula or spinach, as I did), then toss with a Riviera/Italian wacky vinaigrette and … wow!  A great side to chicken or I’m told roast pork.

Ingredients:

5 garlic cloves, unpeeled

3 anchovy filets

1 t capers, rinsed and chopped

2 T chopped parsley

1/2 T red wine vinegar

1 T olive oil

4 turnips, peeled and cut into large bite-size pieces

Turnip greens, arugula or spinach (all optional)

Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 300 degrees (or can go to 350 if need be)
  2. Put garlic cloves on pan and bake for 30 minutes until soft.  Peel when cool enough to handle.  Mash if you want.
  3. Put up large pot of water to boil.
  4. Make (low-volume liquid) vinaigrette: Put anchovies, capers, parsley, oil, vinegar & S&P in a jar and shake.  Add garlic if cool, or else just hold on side to add with turnips later.
  5. When water boils and you’re ready to eat in 15 minutes, salt water and add turnips and boil for 15 minutes or until no resistance when poked with a knife, but before turning mushy.  Add greens at end and drain, returning all to pot.  Add dressing and garlic and stir well. Serve hot.

 

 

 

 

Roasted eggplant

Hello August!  Hello beautiful, succulent, bursting eggplant!  Eggplant is in fact my most beloved vegetable.  I love it roasted, sauteed, pureed, and recently boiled(!), and always, always with garlic.

One of my favorite ways to prepare eggplant is the white pizza equivalent of eggplant parmesan.  You get the eggplant slices, plenty of mozzarella and parmesan, garlic, but no red sauce.  Easier and quicker and, to my palate, tastier.  Here’s the procedure:  Slice one or two eggplants thickly the long way about 1/2-3/4″ thick, put on sheet pan that has olive oil on it, layer on some pureed parsley, garlic and oil, and roast for less than half an hour.  Then throw on some mozzarella and parmesan, bake a little more, and you get meltingly soft eggplant with garlic flavor plus the parsley and that gooey warm cheese.  Yum!  I just made it two nights in a row. I think I could have eggplant almost every day.  Yay August!  Yay eggplant!

 

Ingredients:

1-2 eggplants

4 cloves garlic, rough chopped

1/2 bunch parsley, leaves removed from stems

olive oil

mozzarella — fresh, or supermarket, cut into pieces

parmesan, grated

Directions:

  1. Heat oven to 400 degrees.  Cover sheet pan with aluminum foil and put on a couple T olive oil.
  2. Put into mini food processor:  parsley, garlic, S&P, olive oil.  Whir around.
  3. Cut eggplant into thick slices, first cutting off skin to discard.  Lay on pan and cross-hatch with knife.  Smear on parsley mixture. image
  4. Roast 20-30 mins until tender when poked with fork.image
  5. Layer on mozzarella, then grate parmesan on top.  Use lots!image
  6. Roast another 5-7 mins until cheese is melting.  Try not to eat it all!

Here’s a plethora of eggplant recipes to explore.

Inspiration:  Bittman’s Roasted Eggplant with Garlic and Parsley, How to Cook Everything, p. 570

Summer vegetable soup

When you tire of summer salads, try soup! Now that seems like an odd notion in mid-summer. But…. High-summer season vegetables are coming in now: zucchini, green beans, sweet, sweet carrots. So toss them all in a soup pot and after you make some vegetable stock, make some vegetable soup. Nutritious, delicious and naturally low-calorie/carb.

Ingredients:

1 onion (or 2 spring onions, with greens cut up and added later)

2 large carrots, diced medium

4 garlic cloves, minced medium

thyme – fresh or dried

1 zucchini – soaked, then cut into quarters and sliced

1 bay leaf

¼ to ½ # green beans, tipped and tailed, cut into 1-1/2 to 2” pieces OR bunch of swiss chard, stems removed, leaves torn and washed

1 15-oz can garbanzo beans, rinsed

optional: corn cut from 2-3 ears; leftover rice; parmesan cheese rind; scallions if no fresh onion greens

Directions:

  1. Put zucchini in sink or bowl to soak whole. (Removes any soil that settled into skin.) Dice onion, then carrots.
  2. Heat soup pot and add 2-3 T oil over medium-high heat. Cook onions with salt until soft. Add carrots, zucchini, thyme, S&P (hearty pinch of salt!), and cook until softened. Stir in garlic and bay leaf and cook for a minute until fragrant.
  3. Pour in vegetable stock – about 4-5 cups total (can include some water), and bring to rapid simmer. Throw in green beans and cook about 10+ minutes until just tender. Add rinsed beans, and corn and/or rice, if using.

 

If you have leftovers, refrigerate for up to one week.

Inspiration source